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Volume 1, Number 1—January 1995

Perspective

Emerging Infections: Getting Ahead of the Curve

David SatcherComments to Author 
Author affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Figure

Race adjusted incidence rate* of Haemophilus influenzae type b and non-type b disease detected through laboratory-based surveillance+ among children aged <5 years--United States, 1989-1993.
*Per 100,000 children aged <5 years.
+The surveillance area population was 10.4 million in four states (three counties in the San Francisco Bay Area, eight counties in metropolitan Atlanta, four counties in Tennessee, and the state of Oklahoma).
Source: CDC. Progress toward elimination of Haemophilus in

Figure. Race adjusted incidence rate* of Haemophilus influenzae type b and non-type b disease detected through laboratory-based surveillance+ among children aged <5 years--United States, 1989-1993.
*Per 100,000 children aged <5 years.
+The surveillance area population was 10.4 million in four states (three counties in the San Francisco Bay Area, eight counties in metropolitan Atlanta, four counties in Tennessee, and the state of Oklahoma).
Source: CDC. Progress toward elimination of Haemophilus influenzae type b disease among infants and children--United States, MMWR 1994;43:144-8.

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