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Volume 10, Number 12—December 2004

Research

Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus, Southern Mexico

José G. Estrada-Franco*, Roberto Navarro-Lopez†, Jerome E. Freier‡, Dionicio Cordova§, Tamara Clements¶, Abelardo Moncayo*, Wenli Kang*, Carlos Gomez-Hernandez#, Gabriela Rodriguez-Dominguez#, George V. Ludwig¶, and Scott C. Weaver*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA; †Comision Mexico-Estados Unidos para la Prevencion de la Fiebre Aftosa y Otras Enfermedades Exoticas de los Animales, Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico; ‡U.S. Department of Agriculture, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; §Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agricolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP) Mexico City, Mexico; ¶U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Ft. Detrick, Maryland, USA; #Instituto de Salud de la Secretaria de Salud de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas, Mexico

Main Article

Figure 3

Maximum parsimony phylogenetic tree derived from partial PE2 envelope glycoprotein precursor gene sequences showing relationships of the newly isolated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) strains from sentinel hamsters (Mex01-22 and Mex01-32) to other subtype IE strains sequenced previously (19). Strains are designated by country abbreviation followed by year of isolation and strain designation. Numbers indicate nucleotide substitutions assigned to each branch.

Figure 3. Maximum parsimony phylogenetic tree derived from partial PE2 envelope glycoprotein precursor gene sequences showing relationships of the newly isolated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) strains from sentinel hamsters (Mex01-22 and Mex01-32) to other subtype IE strains sequenced previously (19). Strains are designated by country abbreviation followed by year of isolation and strain designation. Numbers indicate nucleotide substitutions assigned to each branch.

Main Article

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