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Volume 10, Number 12—December 2004

Research

Cats as a Risk for Transmission of Antimicrobial drug−resistant Salmonella

Filip Van Immerseel*Comments to Author , Frank Pasmans*, Jeroen De Buck*, Ivan Rychlik†, Helena Hradecka†, Jean-Marc Collard‡, Christa Wildemauwe§, Marc Heyndrickx¶, Richard Ducatelle*, and Freddy Haesebrouck*
Author affiliations: *Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium; †Veterinary Research Institute, Brno, Czech Republic; ‡Scientific Institute of Public Health, Brussels, Belgium; §Pasteur Institute of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium; ¶Center for Agricultural Research, Melle, Belgium.

Main Article

Figure 2

Invasion of Salmonella strains in the human intestinal epithelial cell line T84. The y-axis shows the percentages of intracellular bacteria 2 hours postinfection, relative to the initial number of bacteria, incubated with the cells. The x-axis shows isolate numbers. All isolates derived from the group-housed cats had the same invasion percentage as strains 198 and 355 (data not shown). Isolates 55 and 1145 had the same invasion percentage as strain 1147 (data not shown). Data not sharing supersc

Figure 2. Invasion of Salmonella strains in the human intestinal epithelial cell line T84. The y-axis shows the percentages of intracellular bacteria 2 hours postinfection, relative to the initial number of bacteria, incubated with the cells. The x-axis shows isolate numbers. All isolates derived from the group-housed cats had the same invasion percentage as strains 198 and 355 (data not shown). Isolates 55 and 1145 had the same invasion percentage as strain 1147 (data not shown). Data not sharing superscript numbers indicate statistically significant differences (p<0.05).

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