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Volume 10, Number 2—February 2004
THEME ISSUE
2004 SARS Edition

SARS Epidemiology

SARS Surveillance during Emergency Public Health Response, United States, March–July 2003

Stephanie J. Schrag*Comments to Author , John T. Brooks*, Chris Van Beneden*, Umesh D. Parashar*, Patricia M. Griffin*, Larry J. Anderson*, William J. Bellini*, Robert F. Benson*, Dean D. Erdman*, Alexander Klimov*, Thomas G. Ksiazek*, Teresa C.T. Peret*, Deborah F. Talkington*, W. Lanier Thacker*, Maria L. Tondella*, Jacquelyn S. Sampson*, Allen W. Hightower*, Dale F. Nordenberg*, Brian D. Plikaytis*, Ali S. Khan*, Nancy E. Rosenstein*, Tracee A. Treadwell*, Cynthia G. Whitney*, Anthony E. Fiore*, Tonji M. Durant*, Joseph F. Perz*, Annemarie Wasley*, Daniel Feikin*, Joy L. Herndon*, William A. Bower*, Barbara W. Kilbourn*, Deborah A. Levy*, Victor G. Coronado*, Joanna Buffington*, Clare A. Dykewicz*, Rima F. Khabbaz*, and Mary E. Chamberland*
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

A) Number of U.S. severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) cases reported to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by week of illness onset (N = 398a) and B) number of unexplained respiratory illness reports received by CDC by week of illness report (N = 1,460), January–July 2003. (SARS-CoV, severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus)

Figure 1. A) Number of U.S. severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) cases reported to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) by week of illness onset (N = 398a) and B) number of unexplained respiratory illness reports received by CDC by week of illness report (N = 1,460), January–July 2003. (SARS-CoV, severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus)

Main Article

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