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Volume 10, Number 3—March 2004

Research

Genomic Changes of Chagas Disease Vector, South America

Francisco Panzera*Comments to Author , Jean Pierre Dujardin†, Paula Nicolini*, María Noel Caraccio*, Virginia Rose*, Tatiana Tellez‡, Hernán Bermúdez‡, María Dolores Bargues§, Santiago Mas-Coma§, José Enrique O’Connor§, and Ruben Pérez*
Author affiliations: *Universidad Mayor de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay; †Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Montpellier, France; ‡Universidad Mayor de San Simón, Cochabamba, Bolivia; §Universidad de Valencia, Valencia, Spain

Main Article

Table 2

C-banding patterns observed in the three largest autosomal pairs of Tiratoma infestans from the non-Andean populations analyzeda

C-banding pattern Argentina (Austral Chaco) [8][13][14]b Bolivia and Paraguay (Boreal Chaco) [11,12] Uruguay
(Pampeana)
[15,16] Brazil (Caatinga) [9,10] Total specimens
BB BB BB
-
1
-
-
1
BB BB AB
1
7
6
-
14
BB BB AA
1
3
43
21
68
BB BB AC
1
-
1
-
2
BB AB AA
4
-
16
1
21
BB AA AA
4
1a
4
1
10
BB AA AC
3
-
-
-
3
BB AB AC
2
-
-
-
2
BB AB CC
2
-
-
-
2
BB AA CC
1
-
-
-
1
AB BB AA
1
-
-
-
1
AB AB AA
2
-
-
-
2
AB AB AC
3
-
-
-
3
AB AA AB
1
-
-
-
1
AB AA AA
1
3c
-
-
4
AA AA AA
-
4c
-
-
4
Total 27 19 70 23 139

aThe population more near the Andean region of Bolivia and Peru, e.g., the Austral Chaco region of Argentine, appeared very variable both in the number of C-banded autosomes and in the karyomorphs observed. By contrast, the samples farthest away from the Andean region, e.g., Brazilian Caatinga populations, were the most homogeneous, almost always exhibiting the same C-karyomorphs (BB BB AA).
bNumbers in brackets refer to the location of the populations in Figure 1.
cSylvatic (dark morphs).

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