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Volume 10, Number 5—May 2004

Dispatch

Rift Valley Fever in Chad

David Ringot*Comments to Author , Jean-Paul Durand†, Hughes Tolou†, Jean-Paul Boutin†, and Bernard Davoust‡
Author affiliations: *Interarmy Veterinary Sector for Montpellier, Nîmes, France; †Tropical Medicine Institute of the French Defense Medical Service, Marseille, France; ‡Medical Service Directorate for Lyon, Lyon, France

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Table 2

Results of the cross-sectional investigation of Rift Valley fever antibody prevalence among sheep, goats, and horned cattle, Chad, 2002 rainy seasona

Animal Average age (y) IgG+b animals (%) Average age of IgG+ animals (y) IgG+ animals age <1 y (% of those age <1 y) % of animals killed in an area that were IgG+ Sex of IgG+ animals IgG+ animals confirmed by WB IgM+ animals (% IgG+)
Sheep
2.3
32/300 (10.7)
1.8
8 (12)
14.8% N, 1.1% A
7.5% of M, 12.8% of F
31
16 (53.3)
Goats
1.7
12/139 (8)
2.2
4 (6)
9% N, 5% A
6.7% of M, 10.8% of F
NA
4 (33.3)
Horned cattle
7.5
5/114 (4)
6.2
NA
5% N, 0% A
0% of M, 4.7% of F
NA
NA
Total 3.2 49/553 (8) 2.8 14 (10.5) 11% N, 2% A 4.4% of M, 11.4% of F NA 20 (45.4)

aIg, immunoglobulin; WB, Western blot; N, N’Djamena; A, Abéché; NA, not available.
bSerum positivity was established when the ratio between the optical density of the Rift Valley fever virus antigen and that of the Dugbe antigen was >3.5.

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