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Volume 10, Number 6—June 2004

Perspective

Airborne Infection with Bacillus anthracis—from Mills to Mail

Kevin P. Fennelly*Comments to Author , Amy L. Davidow*, Shelly L. Miller†, Nancy Connell*, and Jerrold J. Ellner*
Author affiliations: *New Jersey Medical School–UMDNJ, Newark, New Jersey, USA; †University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA

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Figure

Risk for airborne infection with Bacillus anthracis in various scenarios. Home and office exposures are for 1 hour, and postal facility exposures are for 8 hours; for postal facilities, the models assume a 14.6 L/min pulmonary ventilation rate with moderate work, comparable to the rate used to estimate inhaled doses in the Manchester study. ACH, air changes per hour.

Figure. Risk for airborne infection with Bacillus anthracis in various scenarios. Home and office exposures are for 1 hour, and postal facility exposures are for 8 hours; for postal facilities, the models assume a 14.6 L/min pulmonary ventilation rate with moderate work, comparable to the rate used to estimate inhaled doses in the Manchester study. ACH, air changes per hour.

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