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Volume 10, Number 7—July 2004

Research

Q Fever Outbreak in Industrial Setting

Hugo C. van Woerden*Comments to Author , Brendan W. Mason*, Lika K. Nehaul†, Robert P. Smith*, Roland L. Salmon*, Brendan Healy‡, Manoj Valappil§, Diana Westmoreland§, Sarah de Martin†, Meirion R. Evans*, Graham Lloyd¶, Marysia Hamilton-Kirkwood‡, and Nina S. Williams*
Author affiliations: *National Public Health Service for Wales, Cardiff, United Kingdom; †Department of Public Health, Gwent, United Kingdom; ‡Department of Public Health, Cardiff, United Kingdom; §University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, United Kingdom; and; ¶Special Pathogens Reference Unit, Wiltshire, United Kingdom

Main Article

Table 3

Odds ratios (OR) for different risk factors in Q fever outbreak, Newport, Wales, August–September 2002

Exposure at work No. of persons exposed to risk factor
No. of persons not exposed to risk factor
OR (95% CI)
Case Controls Cases Controls
Office refurbished
24
23
6
15
2.61 (0.77–9.57)
Never near an external door or window/near a window or door most days
13
10
40
61
1.98 (0.72–5.56)
Smoker/never smoked
15
35
42
48
0.49 (0.22–1.08)
Saw hay lorry on the docks
4
1
56
82
5.86 (0.55–291.88)
Live on a farm
1
3
72
76
0.35 (0.01–4.53)
Regularly handle compost
1
9
68
83
0.14 (0.00–1.03)
Contact with animal births or miscarriages 0 6 39 54 0.00 (0–1.26)

aCI, confidence interval.

Main Article

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