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Volume 10, Number 7—July 2004

Research

Recombinant Viruses and Early Global HIV-1 Epidemic

Marcia L. Kalish*Comments to Author , Kenneth E. Robbins*, Danuta Pieniazek*, Amanda Schaefer*, Nzila Nzilambi†, Thomas C. Quinn†‡, Michael E. St. Louis*†, Ae S. Youngpairoj*, Jonathan Phillips*, Harold W. Jaffe*, and Thomas M. Folks*
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †Project SIDA, Kinshasa, Zaire; ‡National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

Main Article

Figure 2

Distribution of subtypes and recombinant viruses. The pie chart represents 66 strains for which sequences from at least 2–3 gene regions were available for comparison; the subtypes in the pie chart represent concordant phylogenies suggestive of possible “pure” subtypes; the CRF01 and unique recombinant viruses are indicated in the pie chart. Table 2 summarizes subtypes of unique recombinant viruses.

Figure 2. Distribution of subtypes and recombinant viruses. The pie chart represents 66 strains for which sequences from at least 2–3 gene regions were available for comparison; the subtypes in the pie chart represent concordant phylogenies suggestive of possible “pure” subtypes; the CRF01 and unique recombinant viruses are indicated in the pie chart. Table 2 summarizes subtypes of unique recombinant viruses.

Main Article

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