Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 10, Number 8—August 2004

Research

Long-Term Prognosis for Clinical West Nile Virus Infection

Anne Labowitz Klee*, Beth Maldin*, Barbara Edwin*, Iqbal Poshni*, Farzad Mostashari*, Annie Fine*, Marcelle Layton*, and Denis Nash*†1Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *New York City Department of Health, New York City, New York, USA; †Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; 1Current affiliation: New York Academy of Medicine, New York, New York, USA

Main Article

Table 2

Characteristics of participating and nonparticipating patients who survived clinical West Nile virus infection, New York City, 1999

Characteristic All hospitalized patients, N = 59 (%) Enrolled patients, N = 42 (%) Participants in 12-month interview, N = 35 (%) Nonparticipants in 12-month interview, N = 7 (%)
Age
<65 23 (39) 16 (38) 13 (37) 3 (43)
>65 36 (61) 26 (62) 22 (63) 4 (57)
Sex
Female 28 (47) 20 (48) 18 (51) 2 (29)
Male 31 (53) 22 (52) 17 (49) 5 (71)
Underlying illness before infection
Hypertension 25 (42) 17 (40) 14 (40) 3 (43)
Diabetes 12 (20) 6 (14) 5 (14) 1 (14)
Hypertension or diabetes 31 (53) 19 (45) 16 (46) 3 (43)
Clinical syndrome
Encephalitis 37 (63) 22 (52) 19 (54) 3 (43)
Meningitis or milder illness 22 (37) 20 (48) 16 (46) 4 (57)
Discharge statusa
Dead 7 (12) NA NA NA
Home 22 (37) 20 (50)b 20 (61)c NA
Home of family or friend 3 (5) 3 (8)b 3 (9)c NA
Skilled nursing facility 4 (7) 4 (10)b 4 (12)c NA
Rehabilitation 6 (10) 6 (15)b 6 (18)c NA
Unknown but alive 17 (29) 7 (18)b 0 7 (100)
Required physical therapy NA NA 18 (51) NA

aIncludes hospitalized patients only.
bN = 40 for these calculations.
cN = 33 for these calculations.

Main Article

TOP