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Volume 11, Number 1—January 2005

Research

Mycobacterium haemophilum and Lymphadenitis in Children

Lesla E.S. Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet*, Edward J. Kuijper*Comments to Author , Jerome A. Lindeboom†, Jan M. Prins†, and Eric C. J. Claas*
Author affiliations: *Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; †Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Main Article

Figure

Alignment of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and partial 23S sequences with primers and probes used for real-time polymerase chain (PCR) reaction. (nucleotides [nt] 1 to 301 make up the total ITS region; nt 302 to 367 are coding for partial 23S gene). The Mycobacterium haemophilum sequence was derived from 3 different patients, but no variation was found. A, forward primer for real-time PCR; B, Mycobacterium genus–specific probe; C, M. haemophilum–specific probe; D, reverse primer for real time–polymerase chain reaction.

Figure. Alignment of internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and partial 23S sequences with primers and probes used for real-time polymerase chain (PCR) reaction. (nucleotides [nt] 1 to 301 make up the total ITS region; nt 302 to 367 are coding for partial 23S gene). The Mycobacterium haemophilum sequence was derived from 3 different patients, but no variation was found. A, forward primer for real-time PCR; B, Mycobacterium genus–specific probe; C, M. haemophilum–specific probe; D, reverse primer for real time–polymerase chain reaction.

Main Article

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