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Volume 11, Number 10—October 2005

Dispatch

Poultry-handling Practices during Avian Influenza Outbreak, Thailand

Sonja J. Olsen*Comments to Author , Yongjua Laosiritaworn†, Sarika Pattanasin†, Prabda Prapasiri*, and Scott F. Dowell*
Author affiliations: *International Emerging Infections Program, Nonthaburi, Thailand; †Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand

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Table 2

Knowledge, attitudes, and practices before and after* hearing about avian influenza†

Variable Before, n (%) After, n (%) p value
Knowledge and attitudes
Thought it was safe to touch sick or dead poultry with bare hands 78 (40) 27 (14) <0.01
Thought it was safe for children to touch sick or dead poultry with bare hands 45 (23) 9 (5) <0.01
Thought it was safe to prepare raw poultry and other foods on the same cutting board 98 (50) 73 (37) 0.01
Thought it was safe to eat chicken that was pink in the middle or eggs with a runny yolk 41 (21) 11 (6) <0.01
Practices
Touched sick or dead poultry with bare hands 76 (39) 22 (11) <0.01
Children in household touched sick or dead poultry with bare hands 12 (6) 7 (4) 0.4
Took dead chicken or poultry from yard and prepared it to eat 24 (12) 17 (9) 0.3
Prepared raw poultry and other foods using different cutting boards 64 (33) 83 (42) 0.08
Washed hands with water immediately after preparing raw chicken or poultry 151 (77) 158 (81) 0.3

*Participants were asked to recall the month they first heard about avian influenza and then answer questions recalling their knowledge, attitudes, and practices in the 6 months before versus the 6 months after they heard about it.
†Among the 196 respondents who reported hearing about avian influenza.

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