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Volume 11, Number 10—October 2005

Research

Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Minnesota, 2000–2003

Jessica M. Buck*Comments to Author , Kathryn Como-Sabetti*, Kathleen H. Harriman*, Richard N. Danila*, David J. Boxrud*, Anita Glennen*, and Ruth Lynfield*
Author affiliations: *Minnesota Department of Health, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Main Article

Table 3

Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) invasive disease patient and skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) patient isolate characteristics*

Antimicrobial agent Invasive disease isolates (n = 57),
no. (% susceptible) SSTI isolates (n = 517),
no. (% susceptible) OR (95% CI) p value† p value‡
Oxacillin (methicillin) 0 0 NA
Ciprofloxacin 37 (65) 433 (84) 3.34 (1.67–6.69) 0.002 0.23
Clindamycin 44 (77) 475 (92) 2.79 (1.54–5.04) 0.001 0.20
Erythromycin 21 (37) 201 (39) 1.09 (0.62–1.92)
Gentamicin 56 (98) 509 (98) 1.14 (0.14–9.25)
Linezolid 57 (100) 517 (100) NA
Mupirocin 56 (98) 508 (98) 1.14 (0.14–9.23)
Rifampin 56 (98) 515 (99) 4.60 (0.41–51.5)
Tetracyline 52 (91) 469 (91) 0.94 (0.36–2.46)
Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole 56 (98) 514 (99) 3.06 (0.31–2.99)
Vancomycin 57 (100) 517 (100) NA

*OR, odds ratio; CI, confidence interval; NA, not applicable.
†Refers to the probablility that the percentage susceptible for invasive CA-MRSA isolates differed from SSTI CA-MRSA isolates after controlling for sex and age.
‡Refers to the probability that the percentage susceptible for invasive CA-MRSA isolates differed from SSTI CA-MRSA isolates after controlling for sex and pulsed-field type associated with healthcare-associated MRSA or CA-MRSA.

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