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Volume 11, Number 10—October 2005

Research

Vancomycin and Home Health Care

Thomas G. Fraser*1, Valentina Stosor*, Qiong Wang†, Anne Allen‡, and Teresa R. Zembower*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA; †University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, Chicago, Illinois, USA; ‡Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Main Article

Table 5

Microbiologic investigations and results for home infusions of vancomycin*

Investigation or result Use per guidelines, no. (%), N = 180 Use outside guidelines, no. (%), N = 116 p value†
Microbiologic diagnostic attempt 173 (96.1) 90 (77.6) <0.001
Cultures by site
Blood 137 (76.1) 74 (63.8) 0.022
Sterile site 25 (13.9) 11 (9.5) 0.258
Urine 96 (53.3) 48 (41.4) 0.045
Sputum 17 (9.4) 6 (5.2) 0.180
Wound 96 (53.3) 45 (38.8) 0.015
Other culture 15 (8.3) 11 (9.5) 0.733
>1 culture 136 (75.6) 65 (56.0) <0.001
Bacterial isolates
MRSA 81 (45.0) 2 (1.7)‡ §
Coagulase-negative staphylococci 59 (32.8) 20 (17.2)
Ampicillin-resistant enterococci 3 (1.7) 0
Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus 16 (8.9) 19 (16.4)
Other streptococci and enterococci 52 (28.9) 18 (15.5)
Corynebacterium jeikeium 2 (1.1) 0
Culture considered contaminated 20 (11.1) 20 (17.2)

*MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
†Values <0.05 were considered significant.
‡The 2 patients outside the guidelines with an MRSA culture included 1 patient with MRSA in the urine but no diagnosis of a urinary tract infection, and 1 with a positive intravascular catheter tip culture but no evidence of infection.
§A p value is not included because infection with these isolates was 1 factor used to determine whether vancomycin was given per guidelines.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

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