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Volume 11, Number 11—November 2005

Dispatch

Long-term Death Rates, West Nile Virus Epidemic, Israel, 2000

Manfred S. Green*†Comments to Author , Miriam Weinberger†‡, Judith Ben-Ezer*, Hanna Bin§, Ella Mendelson§, Dan Gandacu¶, Zalman Kaufman*, Rita Dichtiar*, Annette Sobel#, Dani Cohen*†, and Michal Y. Chowers†**
Author affiliations: *Israel Center for Disease Control, Tel Hashomer, Israel; †Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; ‡Rabin Medical Center, Petach Tikva, Israel; §Central Virology Laboratory, Tel Hashomer, Israel; ¶Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel; #State of New Mexico Office of Homeland Security, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA; **Meir Medical Center, Kfar Sava, Israel

Main Article

Figure 2

Kaplan-Meier survival curves for 2-year mortality follow-up of 246 patients discharged from hospital after West Nile Virus infection during the epidemic in Israel in 2000, by sex. *Survival after 1 year; **survival after 2 years; ***relative risk (RR) for women compared with men, adjusted for age, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, immunodeficiency, cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, and dementia.

Figure 2. Kaplan-Meier survival curves for 2-year mortality follow-up of 246 patients discharged from hospital after West Nile Virus infection during the epidemic in Israel in 2000, by sex. *Survival after 1 year; **survival after 2 years; ***relative risk (RR) for women compared with men, adjusted for age, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, immunodeficiency, cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, and dementia.

Main Article

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