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Volume 11, Number 12—December 2005

Dispatch

Central African Hunters Exposed to Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

Marcia L. Kalish*Comments to Author , Nathan D. Wolfe†, Clement B. Ndongmo*, Janet McNicholl*, Kenneth E. Robbins*, Michael Aidoo*, Peter N. Fonjungo*‡, George Alemnji‡, Clement Zeh*, Cyrille F. Djoko§, Eitel Mpoudi-Ngole‡, Donald S. Burke†, and Thomas M. Folks*
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; ‡Project IRECAM (Investigation of Retroviruses in Cameroon), Yaoundé, Cameroon; §Johns Hopkins Cameroon Program, Yaoundé, Cameroon

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Figure 1

Simian immunodeficiency (SIV) multiple antigenic peptide–enzyme immunoassay (SMAP-EIA) seroreactivity trends to SIV immunodominant region (IDR) peptides in HIV-seronegative Cameroonian population groups with different levels of exposure (high exposure [HE], low exposure [LE], or general [G]) to nonhuman primates. OD, optical density. χ2 linear trend 48.166, p<0.001.

Figure 1. Simian immunodeficiency (SIV) multiple antigenic peptide–enzyme immunoassay (SMAP-EIA) seroreactivity trends to SIV immunodominant region (IDR) peptides in HIV-seronegative Cameroonian population groups with different levels of exposure (high exposure [HE], low exposure [LE], or general [G]) to nonhuman primates. OD, optical density. χ2 linear trend 48.166, p<0.001.

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