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Volume 11, Number 12—December 2005

Perspective

Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum

J. Stephen Dumler*Comments to Author , Kyoung-Seong Choi*, Jose Carlos Garcia-Garcia*, Nicole S. Barat*, Diana G. Scorpio*, Justin W. Garyu*, Dennis J. Grab*, and Johan S. Bakken†‡
Author affiliations: *Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; †University of Minnesota at Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota, USA; ‡St. Luke's Hospital, Duluth, Minnesota, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Anaplasma phagocytophilum in human peripheral blood band neutrophil (A. Wright stain, original magnification ×1,000), in THP-1 myelomonocytic cell culture (B, LeukoStat stain, original magnification, ×400), in neutrophils infiltrating human spleen (C, immunohistochemistry with hematoxylin counterstain; original magnification ×100), and ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy in HL-60 cell culture (D; courtesy of V. Popov; original magnification ×21,960).

Figure 1Anaplasma phagocytophilum in human peripheral blood band neutrophil (A. Wright stain, original magnification ×1,000), in THP-1 myelomonocytic cell culture (B, LeukoStat stain, original magnification, ×400), in neutrophils infiltrating human spleen (C, immunohistochemistry with hematoxylin counterstain; original magnification ×100), and ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy in HL-60 cell culture (D; courtesy of V. Popov; original magnification ×21,960).

Main Article

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