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Volume 11, Number 2—February 2005

Research

Bacterial Zoonoses and Infective Endocarditis, Algeria

Akila Benslimani*1, Florence Fenollar†1, Hubert Lepidi†, and Didier Raoult†Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Service de Biologie Clinique, Alger, Algérie; †Université de la Méditerranée, Marseille, France

Main Article

Figure 3

A) Section of an aortic valve from a patient with Bartonella endocarditis. Note the extensive fibrosis of the connective valve tissue (arrowhead), the vegetation (*), and the low inflammatory infiltrate of the valve tissue (hematoxylin-phloxine-saffron, original magnification 100x). B) Resected valve with Bartonella quintana infection showing darkly stained bacilli consistent with Bartonella. Note the numerous clusters of argyrophilic bacteria present in the valvular vegetation (Warthin-Starry s

Figure 3. A) Section of an aortic valve from a patient with Bartonella endocarditis. Note the extensive fibrosis of the connective valve tissue (arrowhead), the vegetation (*), and the low inflammatory infiltrate of the valve tissue (hematoxylin-phloxine-saffron, original magnification 100x). B) Resected valve with Bartonella quintana infection showing darkly stained bacilli consistent with Bartonella. Note the numerous clusters of argyrophilic bacteria present in the valvular vegetation (Warthin-Starry silver, original magnification 1,000x). C) Immunohistochemical detection of B. quintana in a resected valve from a patient with Bartonella endocarditis. Note the extracellular distribution of the bacterial colonies (*) in the valvular vegetation (polyclonal antibody and hematoxylin counterstain, original magnification 250x).

Main Article

1These 2 authors have contributed equally to the manuscript.

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