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Volume 11, Number 2—February 2005

Research

Human Disease from Influenza A (H5N1), Thailand, 2004

Tawee Chotpitayasunondh*, Kumnuan Ungchusak†, Wanna Hanshaoworakul†, Supamit Chunsuthiwat†, Pathom Sawanpanyalert†, Rungruen Kijphati†, Sorasak Lochindarat*, Panida Srisan*, Pongsan Suwan†, Yutthasak Osotthanakorn†, Tanakorn Anantasetagoon†, Supornchai Kanjanawasri†, Sureeporn Tanupattarachai†, Jiranun Weerakul†, Ruangsri Chaiwirattana†, Monthira Maneerattanaporn†, Rapol Poolsavatkitikool†, Kulkunya Chokephaibulkit‡, Anucha Apisarnthanarak§, and Scott F. Dowell¶Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health, Bangkok, Thailand; †Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand; ‡Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand; §Thammasat University Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand; ¶International Emerging Infections Program, Nonthaburi, Thailand

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Figure 1

Epidemic curve showing the dates of onset for 12 confirmed and 21 suspected human cases of avian influenza A (H5N1) infection, Thailand, 2004.

Figure 1. Epidemic curve showing the dates of onset for 12 confirmed and 21 suspected human cases of avian influenza A (H5N1) infection, Thailand, 2004.

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