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Volume 11, Number 3—March 2005

Research

Rapid Identification of Emerging Pathogens: Coronavirus

Rangarajan Sampath*Comments to Author , Steven A. Hofstadler*, Lawrence B. Blyn*, Mark W. Eshoo*, Thomas A. Hall*, Christian Massire*, Harold M. Levene*, James C. Hannis*, Patina M. Harrell*, Benjamin Neuman†, Michael J. Buchmeier†, Yun Jiang*, Raymond Ranken*, Jared J. Drader*, Vivek Samant*, Richard H. Griffey*, John A. McNeil*, Stanley T. Crooke*, and David J. Ecker*
Author affiliations: *Ibis Therapeutics, Carlsbad, California, USA; †The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California, USA

Main Article

Figure 2

Detection of 3 human coronavirus (CoV) in a mixture. The deconvoluted (neutral mass) mass spectra obtained for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase primer for the 3 human CoV, HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43, and severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated CoV, which were tested individually and in a mixture are shown. Forward and reverse amplicons are shown with the measured monoisotopic masses for each strand. Colors of the monoisotopic masses for the mixed spectra correspond to the individual viral species

Figure 2. . Detection of 3 human coronavirus (CoV) in a mixture. The deconvoluted (neutral mass) mass spectra obtained for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase primer for the 3 human CoV, HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43, and severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated CoV, which were tested individually and in a mixture are shown. Forward and reverse amplicons are shown with the measured monoisotopic masses for each strand. Colors of the monoisotopic masses for the mixed spectra correspond to the individual viral species.

Main Article

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