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Volume 11, Number 3—March 2005

Dispatch

Human Metapneumovirus RNA in Encephalitis Patient

Oliver Schildgen*1Comments to Author , Thomas Glatzel*1, Tilman Geikowski*, Bärbel Scheibner*, Arne Simon*, Lutz Bindl*, Mark Born*, Sergei Viazov†, Anja Wilkesmann*, Gisela Knöpfle*, Michael Roggendorf†, and Bertfried Matz*
Author affiliations: *University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; †University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 1These authors contributed equally to this study.

Main Article

Figure 1

Axial T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan (A) and coronal fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) (B) show multifocal, mainly cortical and subcortical lesions of high signal intensity, which are most probably caused by multifocal encephalitis. C) Nonenhanced axial computed tomographic (CT) scan performed 2 days after the MRI shows multiple, hypodense lesions and signs of general edema. Additionally, it shows a hyperdense arachnoid collection that was not yet visible on the MRI

Figure 1. . Axial T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan (A) and coronal fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) (B) show multifocal, mainly cortical and subcortical lesions of high signal intensity, which are most probably caused by multifocal encephalitis. C) Nonenhanced axial computed tomographic (CT) scan performed 2 days after the MRI shows multiple, hypodense lesions and signs of general edema. Additionally, it shows a hyperdense arachnoid collection that was not yet visible on the MRI 2 days before (panels A and B).

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