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Volume 11, Number 6—June 2005

Dispatch

Dana Cole, Georgia Division of Public Health, Notifiable Disease Section, Department of Human Resources, 2 Peachtree Free-living Canada Geese and Antimicrobial Resistance

Dana Cole*, David J.V. Drum†, David E. Stallknecht†, David G. White‡, Margie D. Lee†, Sherry Ayers‡, Mark Sobsey§, and John J. Maurer†
Author affiliations: *Georgia Division of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA; ‡US Food and Drug Administration, Laurel, Maryland, USA; §University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

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Table

Antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes of Escherichia coli isolated from Canada Geese sampled in Georgia and North Carolina

Antimicrobial resistance phenotype* and genotype Site†
Lake Julliette
Craven County
Griffin
Stone Mountain
n = 2 n = 25 (%) n = 21 (%) n = 0
Pansusceptible‡ 2 7 (28) 17 (81)
Ampicillin 5 (20) 1 (5)
Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 0 2 (10)
Cefoxitin 0 2 (10)
Cephalothin 1 (4) 4 (19)
Tetracycline 16 (64) 0
Sulfamethoxazole 6 (24) 0
Gentamicin 2 (8) 0
Kanamycin 2 (8) 0
Streptomycin 14 (56) 0
Nalidixic acid 1 (4) 0
Resistance to ≥3 antimicrobial agents 12 (48) 2 (10)
Integron and antimicrobial resistance genes
intI1 9 (36) 0
sul1 3 (12) 0
aadA1 3 (12) 0
blaTEM 6 (24) 0

*All isolates, regardless of geographic locale, were susceptible to ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, imipenem, amikacin, apramycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole.
†No gram-negative bacteria were isolated from geese captured at Stone Mountain.
‡Isolates were susceptible to all 18 antimicrobial agents tested.

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