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Volume 11, Number 6—June 2005

Research

Methicillin-resistant–Staphylococcus aureus Hospitalizations, United States

Matthew J. Kuehnert*, Holly A. Hill*, Benjamin A. Kupronis*, Jerome I. Tokars*, Steven L. Solomon*, and Daniel B. Jernigan*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Main Article

Table 1

Staphylococcus aureus–related discharge diagnoses, United States, 1999–2000, by patient age and infection site*

Discharge diagnosis Age (y)
<14 15–44 45–64 >65 Total†
S. aureus septicemias 2,918 12,272 20,028 38,948 74,166
Proportion of methicillin-resistant isolates from blood culture 0.144 0.317 0.392 0.495 0.424
MRSA septicemias 420 3,890 7,851 19,279 31,440
S. aureus pneumonias 2,328 5,582 6,926 41,427 56,263
Proportion of methicillin-resistant isolates from lower respiratory culture 0.195 0.333 0.467 0.586 0.530
MRSA pneumonias 454 1,859 3,234 24,276 29,823
Other S. aureus infections 14,290 39,222 40,496 67,105 161,113
Proportion of methicillin-resistant isolates from other culture sites 0.160 0.279 0.378 0.539 0.402
Other MRSA infections 2,286 10,943 15,307 36,170 64,706

*MRSA, methicillin-resistant S. aureus.
†Due to rounding of methicillin-resistant proportions, total MRSA infections may differ slightly when estimates are calculated across category groups by row (i.e., age) compared with column (i.e., infection site).

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