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Volume 11, Number 6—June 2005

Dispatch

Hospitalization and Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella Outbreaks, 1984–2002

Jay K. Varma*Comments to Author , Katherine D. Greene*, Jessa Ovitt†, Timothy J. Barrett*, Felicita Medalla*, and Frederick J. Angulo*
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; †Private practice, Lenoir, NC, USA

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Table

Hospitalization and death rates among nontyphoidal Salmonella outbreaks by resistance pattern, 1984–2002*

Resistance pattern Outbreaks
Patients
n (median % [range]) p value No./total (%) p value
Hospitalization
Pansusceptible 22 (9.7 [0–37.5]) Referent 164/2,194 (7.5) Referent
Resistant >1 10 (26.2 [9.3–49.3]) <0.01 2,913/13,286 (21.9) <0.01
R-type AC/KSSuT 7 (26.1 [9.3–48.9]) 0.02 2,827/12,806 (22.1) <0.01
Clinically important agent 9 (26.1 [9.3–48.9]) 0.04 2,877/13,213 (21.8) <0.01
Death
Pansusceptible 16 (0 [0–0.6]) Referent 2/3,283 (0.06) Referent
Resistant >1 8 (0.1 [0–1.4]) 0.05 23/18,644 (0.1) 0.57
R-type AC/KSSuT 5 (0 [0–0.7]) 0.21 20/17,150 (0.1) 0.56
Clinically important agent 6 (0 [0–0.7]) 0.69 20/17,865 (0.1) 0.80

*AC/KSSut, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline.

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