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Volume 11, Number 6—June 2005

Dispatch

Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Pediatric Patients

Theresa J. Ochoa*, John Mohr*, Audrey Wanger*†, James R. Murphy*, and Gloria P. Heresi*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA; †Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA

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Table 2

Site of infection with CA-MRSA or CA-MSSA*

Site No. MRSA (n = 159), (%) No. MSSA (n = 80), (%) p value
Abscess 80 (50.3) 23 (28.7) <0.01
Lymphadenitis 35 (22.0) 13 (16.2) NS
Pneumonia 17 (10.7) 13 (16.2) NS
Complicated pneumonia† 12/17 (70.6) 2/13 (15.4) <0.01
Cellulitis 12 (7.5) 8 (10.0) NS
Osteoarticular‡ 10 (6.3) 8 (10.0) NS
Other§ 5 (3.1) 15 (18.7) ND

*CA, community-associated; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; MSSA, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus; NS, not significant; ND, not done (various diagnosis grouped).
†Empyema, necrotizing pneumonia, pneumatocele, or pneumothorax.
‡Osteomyelitis or septic arthritis.
§Sinusitis, preseptal and septal cellulitis, retropharyngeal and mediastinal abscess, urinary tract infection, toxic shock syndrome, isolated bacteremia.

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