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Volume 11, Number 6—June 2005

Research

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci in Rural Communities, Western United States

Kurt B. Stevenson*†Comments to Author , Katy Searle†, Gregory Stoddard†, and Matthew H. Samore†‡
Author affiliations: *Qualis Health, Boise, Idaho, USA; †University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA; ‡VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

Main Article

Table 1

Characteristics of VRE and MRSA clinical cases*

Characterization VRE
MRSA
No. (N = 32) % No. (N = 724) %
Healthcare-associated 25 78 405 56
Community-associated 7 22 319 44
without coexisting factors 6 19 240 33
with coexisting factors 1 3 79 11
Location of time of culture
Community 9† 28 391‡ 54
Ward 4 13 113 16
Intensive care unit 0 0 24 3
Long-term care facility 6 19 147 20
Transitional care unit 12 38 19 3
Other hospital 1 3 29 4
Clinical sources
Skin and soft tissue 4 13 400 55
Urine 15 47 104 14
Blood 2 6 38 5
Sputum 0 0 116 16
Other 11 34 64 9
Unknown 0 0 2 1
Coexisting factors
>65 years of age 19 59 353 49
Diabetes mellitus 4 13 142 20
Renal failure 3 9 61 8
Prior antimicrobial therapy 5 16 210 29
Immunosuppression 6 19 77 11
Sex
Male 14 44 382 53
Female 18 56 342 47

*VRE, vancomycin-resistant enterococci; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
†There were 2 VRE cases in which cultures were obtained in the community setting in patients with previous history of healthcare exposure (recent hospitalization, residence in long-term care facility).
‡There were 72 MRSA cases in which cultures were obtained in the community setting in patients with previous history of healthcare exposure. The location at the time of culture was unknown in one MRSA case.

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