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Volume 11, Number 7—July 2005

Dispatch

Caliciviruses and Foodborne Gastroenteritis, Chile

Roberto Vidal*, Veronica Solari†, Nora Mamani*, Xi Jiang‡, Jimena Vollaire†, Patricia Roessler*, Valeria Prado*, David O. Matson§, and Miguel L. O'Ryan*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *University of Chile, Santiago, Chile; †Health Ministry of Chile, Santiago, Chile; ‡University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; §Eastern Virginia Medical School and Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters, Norfolk, Virginia, USA

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Table 1

Proportion of acute diarrhea outbreaks associated with a bacterial enteropathogens or a human calicivirus (HuCV) and number of persons affected during the HuCV outbreaks

Year No. outbreaks positive*/no. tested
No. affected in HuCV outbreaks
Bacteria† % HuCVs % Range (median)
2000 8/13 61 4/12 33 3–28 (4)
2001 11/32 34 6/18 33 2–54 (5)
2002 6/34 18 14/22 64 2–99 (5)
2003‡ 1/3 33 1/3 33 5
Total 26/82 32 25/55§ 45 2–99 (5)

*An outbreak was associated with a given pathogen if ≥1 sample was positive.
†Bacteria isolated included: enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) (2), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (3), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (3), EPEC + ETEC (1), Salmonella sp (12), Shigella sp (2), Staphylococcus aureus (3).
‡January 1–10, 2003.
§In 1 outbreak, ETEC and EPEC and in another, Shiga toxin–producing E. coli, were concomitantly isolated with HuCV. In 1 additional outbreak the only pathogens simultaneously detected in 1 patient were rotavirus and adenovirus by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

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