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Volume 11, Number 8—August 2005

Dispatch

Staphylococcus lugdunensis Pacemaker-related Infection

Harald Seifert*Comments to Author , Dirk Oltmanns*, Karsten Becker†, Hilmar Wisplinghoff*, and Christof von Eiff†
Author affiliations: *University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; †University of Münster Hospital and Clinics, Münster, Germany

Main Article

Figure 1

Sheep blood agar plates (A–E) and magnified sectors (a–e) after overnight incubation at 37°C showing different morphotypes of clonal isolates of the Staphylococcus lugdunensis strain recovered from blood cultures and the infected pocket of a patient with pacemaker infection. Plates A–D/a–d show S. lugdunensis colonies exhibiting the normal phenotype characterized by colonies of different diameter, ranging from 0.8 to 2.5 mm with creamy (A/a) or yellow (B–D/b–d) pigmentation and moderately heavy

Figure 1. . Sheep blood agar plates (A–E) and magnified sectors (a–e) after overnight incubation at 37°C showing different morphotypes of clonal isolates of the Staphylococcus lugdunensis strain recovered from blood cultures and the infected pocket of a patient with pacemaker infection. Plates A–D/a–d show S. lugdunensis colonies exhibiting the normal phenotype characterized by colonies of different diameter, ranging from 0.8 to 2.5 mm with creamy (A/a) or yellow (B–D/b–d) pigmentation and moderately heavy (B/b), weak (C–D/c–d), or absent (A/a) hemolysis; plate E/e shows the small-colony variant phenotype characterized by tiny (pinpoint), nonpigmented, and nonhemolytic colonies.

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