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Volume 11, Number 8—August 2005

Research

Estimating Foodborne Gastroenteritis, Australia

Gillian Hall*Comments to Author , Martyn D. Kirk†, Niels Becker*, Joy E. Gregory‡, Leanne Unicomb§, Geoffrey Millard¶, Russell Stafford#, Karin Lalor‡, and the OzFoodNet Working Group
Author affiliations: *Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (ACT), Australia; †OzFoodNet, Canberra, ACT, Australia; ‡Department of Human Services, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; §Hunter Population Health Unit, Wallsend, New South Wales, Australia; ¶ACT Analytical Laboratory, Weston Creek, ACT, Australia; #Queensland Health, Archerfield, Queensland, Australia

Main Article

Table 3

Infectious and foodborne gastroenteritis in Australia in a typical year, circa 2000*

Measure All causes estimate
(95% CrI) Foodborne transmission estimate
(95% CrI)
No. cases per year (×106) 17.2 (14.5–19.9) 5.4 (4.0–6.9)
Known pathogen 4.6 (3.7–5.5) 1.5 (1.0–1.9)
Cases per person per year 0.92 (0.77–1.06) 0.29 (0.23–0.35)
No. hospital diagnoses per year (×103) 40.9 (32.7–48.6) 14.7 (11.4–17.7)
Known pathogen 10.1 (8.6–11.5) 3.6 (2.6–4.7)
Hospital diagnoses per 10,000 persons per year 22 (17–26) 8 (6–9)
Deaths per year 217 (120–320) 76 (40–120)
Deaths per 10,000 persons per year 0.12 (0.06–0.17) 0.04 (0.02–0.06)

*CrI, credibility interval.

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