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Volume 12, Number 10—October 2006

Dispatch

Chimpanzee Adenovirus Antibodies in Humans, Sub-Saharan Africa

Zhiquan Xiang*, Yan Li*, Ann Cun*, Wei Yang†, Susan Ellenberg†, William M. Switzer‡, Marcia L. Kalish‡, and Hildegund C.J. Ertl*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; †University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; ‡Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Table 2

Mean adenovirus neutralizing antibody titers for positive samples

Origin Mean VNA* titer ± standard deviation†
AdHu5 AdC68 AdC6 AdC1
Humans, United States 116 ± 111 40 ± 0 20 ± 0 20 ± 0
Humans, Thailand 303 ± 353‡ 20 ± 0 80 ± 44 33 ± 25
Humans, Cameroon 125 ± 114 109 ± 145 82 ± 52‡ 58 ± 41
Humans, Côte d'Ivoire 162 ± 212 60 ± 51‡ 37 ± 34‡ 148 ± 275
Humans, Nigeria 165 ± 206 29 ± 20 80 ± 115‡ 42 ± 23
Chimpanzees, United States 164 ± 233 201 ± 204 137 ± 160 64 ± 72

*VNA , virus neutralizing antibody.
†p values were determined by a Student t test to assess differences between titers in experimental samples and control samples. Human sera from the United States were used as a reference for antibodies to AdHu5, and chimpanzee sera were used as a reference for titers to AdC68, AdC6, and AdC1. Experimental samples in which >10 samples were positive for the given adenovirus are shown in boldface.
‡Samples that showed a statistically significant difference (p<0.05).

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