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Volume 12, Number 10—October 2006

Research

Active Cytomegalovirus Infection in Patients with Septic Shock

Lutz von Müller*, Anke Klemm*, Manfred Weiss*, Marion Schneider*, Heide Suger-Wiedeck*, Nilgün Durmus*, Walter Hampl*, and Thomas Mertens*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *University Hospital Ulm, Ulm, Germany

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Figure

First detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation after onset of septic shock. Incidence of active CMV and HSV infection is shown for patients with active CMV infection (group 1; n = 8) and without active CMV infection (group 2; n = 17). CMV reactivation occurred during the first 2 weeks after onset of septic shock (median 7 days) and was associated with HSV reactivation, which occurred during the same period. The incidence of active HSV infection was different

Figure. First detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation after onset of septic shock. Incidence of active CMV and HSV infection is shown for patients with active CMV infection (group 1; n = 8) and without active CMV infection (group 2; n = 17). CMV reactivation occurred during the first 2 weeks after onset of septic shock (median 7 days) and was associated with HSV reactivation, which occurred during the same period. The incidence of active HSV infection was different between groups 1 and 2 (75% vs 12%; p = 0.004). Active CMV infection was detected first by CMV pp65 antigenemia; active HSV infection was detected by virus isolation of bronchial aspirates.

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