Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 12, Number 11—November 2006

Research

Gastroenteritis and Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Households1

Sharon Perry*Comments to Author , Maria de la Luz Sanchez*, Shufang Yang*, Thomas D. Haggerty*, Philip Hurst†, Guillermo Perez-Perez‡, and Julie Parsonnet*
Author affiliations: *Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA; †Santa Clara County Health and Hospital Systems, San Jose, California, USA; ‡New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA

Main Article

Table 3

Risk factors for new infection in households with >1 Helicobacter–pylori infected participant*

Symptoms of H. pylori–infected household contact Definite/probable new infections (n = 14 in 555 households)
All new infections (n = 23 in 566 households)
AOR 95% CI AOR 95% CI
No GE 1.0 1.0
GE w/ vomiting ± diarrhea 6.3 1.6–24.5 2.9 1.0–8.1
GE w/ diarrhea only 3.0 0.5–17.2 1.6 0.4–6.2

*AOR, adjusted odds ratio (random intercept model (household), adjusting for age, sleeping density, proportion of household completing both visits); CI, confidence interval; GE, gastroenteritis.

*AOR, adjusted odds ratio (random intercept model (household), adjusting for age, sleeping density, proportion of household completing both visits); CI, confidence interval; GE, gastroenteritis.

*AOR, adjusted odds ratio (random intercept model (household), adjusting for age, sleeping density, proportion of household completing both visits); CI, confidence interval; GE, gastroenteritis.

Main Article

1Portions of this manuscript were presented in preliminary form at Digestive Disease Week 2005, May 15–19, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

TOP