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Volume 12, Number 11—November 2006

Research

Targeted Social Distancing Designs for Pandemic Influenza

Robert J. Glass*Comments to Author , Laura M. Glass†, Walter E. Beyeler*, and H. Jason Min*
Author affiliations: *Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA; †Albuquerque Public High School, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Typical groups and person-to-person links for model teenager. The teenager (T1) belongs to a household (fully connected network, mean link contact frequency 6/day), an extended family or neighborhood (fully connected network, mean link contact frequency 1/day), and 6 school classes (ring network with connections to 2 other teenagers on each side as shown in black; purple links denote connections of other teenagers within the class; mean link contact frequency 1/day). Two random networks are also

Figure 1. Typical groups and person-to-person links for model teenager. The teenager (T1) belongs to a household (fully connected network, mean link contact frequency 6/day), an extended family or neighborhood (fully connected network, mean link contact frequency 1/day), and 6 school classes (ring network with connections to 2 other teenagers on each side as shown in black; purple links denote connections of other teenagers within the class; mean link contact frequency 1/day). Two random networks are also imposed, 1 within the age group (teenager random, average of 3 links/teenager, mean link contact frequency of 1/day), and 1 across all age groups (overall random average of 25 links/person [not all links shown], mean link contact frequency of 0.04/day).

Main Article

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