Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 12, Number 11—November 2006

Research

Targeted Social Distancing Designs for Pandemic Influenza

Robert J. Glass*Comments to Author , Laura M. Glass†, Walter E. Beyeler*, and H. Jason Min*
Author affiliations: *Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA; †Albuquerque Public High School, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

Main Article

Figure 4

Initial growth of an infectious contact network. Colored rectangles denote persons of designated age class, and colored arrows denote groups within which the infectious transmission takes place. In this example, from the adult initial seed (large purple rectangle), 2 household contacts (light purple arrows) bring influenza to the middle or high school (blue arrows) where it spreads to other teenagers. Teenagers then spread influenza to children in households who spread it to other children in th

Figure 4. Initial growth of an infectious contact network. Colored rectangles denote persons of designated age class, and colored arrows denote groups within which the infectious transmission takes place. In this example, from the adult initial seed (large purple rectangle), 2 household contacts (light purple arrows) bring influenza to the middle or high school (blue arrows) where it spreads to other teenagers. Teenagers then spread influenza to children in households who spread it to other children in the elementary schools. Children and teenagers form the backbone of the infectious contact network and are critical to its spread; infectious transmissions occur mostly in the household, neighborhood, and schools.

Main Article

TOP