Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 12, Number 12—December 2006

Research

Long-term Psychological and Occupational Effects of Providing Hospital Healthcare during SARS Outbreak

Robert G. Maunder*†Comments to Author , William J. Lancee*†, Kenneth E. Balderson*‡, Jocelyn P. Bennett*, Bjug Borgundvaag*†, Susan Evans§, Christopher M.B. Fernandes¶#, David S. Goldbloom†**, Mona Gupta†††, Jonathan J. Hunter*†, Linda McGillis Hall†, Lynn M. Nagle†, Clare Pain*†, Sonia S. Peczeniuk‡‡, Glenna Raymond§§, Nancy Read‡, Sean B. Rourke†‡, Rosalie J. Steinberg*†, Thomas E. Stewart*†, Susan VanDeVelde Coke††, Georgina G. Veldhorst¶¶, and Donald A. Wasylenki†‡
Author affiliations: *Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; †University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; ‡Saint Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; §The Scarborough Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; ¶Hamilton Health Sciences Centre, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; #McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; **Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; ††Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; ‡‡Rouge Valley Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; §§Whitby Mental Health Centre, Whitby, Canada; ¶¶North York General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Main Article

Figure

Relationship between prolonged perception of personal risk and reporting multiple adverse consequences of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Toronto healthcare workers. Adverse outcomes are burnout; psychological distress; posttraumatic stress; decrease in face-to-face patient time since SARS; decrease in work hours since SARS; increase in smoking, drinking alcohol or other behavior that might interfere with work or relationships since SARS; and >4 work shifts missed because of stres

Figure. Relationship between prolonged perception of personal risk and reporting multiple adverse consequences of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Toronto healthcare workers. Adverse outcomes are burnout; psychological distress; posttraumatic stress; decrease in face-to-face patient time since SARS; decrease in work hours since SARS; increase in smoking, drinking alcohol or other behavior that might interfere with work or relationships since SARS; and >4 work shifts missed because of stress or illness in the past 4 months.

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO