Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 12, Number 12—December 2006

Dispatch

Mastomys natalensis and Lassa Fever, West Africa

Emilie Lecompte*Comments to Author , Elisabeth Fichet-Calvet†, Stéphane Daffis*‡, Kékoura Koulémou§, Oumar Sylla§, Fodé Kourouma§, Amadou Doré§, Barré Soropogui§, Vladimir Aniskin¶, Bernard Allali#, Stéphane Kouassi Kan#, Aude Lalis†, Lamine Koivogui§, Stephan Günther**, Christiane Denys†, and Jan ter Meulen*††
Author affiliations: *Philipps University Institute of Virology, Marburg, Germany; †Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France; ‡Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA; §Projet de Recherches sur les Fièvres Hémorragiques en Guinée, Conakry, Guinea; ¶Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Moscow, Russia; #Institut Pasteur d'Abidjan, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire; **Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany; ††Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands

Main Article

Figure 2

Phylogenetic relationships of Lassa virus strains based on a nucleoprotein gene fragment (631 bp) determined by using the neighbor-joining method. The numbers above branches are bootstrap values >50% (1,000 replicates). Scale bar indicates 10% divergence. Localities are indicated by the specimen label: DGD (Denguédou), BA (Bantou), GB (Gbetaya), and TA (Tanganya).

Figure 2. Phylogenetic relationships of Lassa virus strains based on a nucleoprotein gene fragment (631 bp) determined by using the neighbor-joining method. The numbers above branches are bootstrap values >50% (1,000 replicates). Scale bar indicates 10% divergence. Localities are indicated by the specimen label: DGD (Denguédou), BA (Bantou), GB (Gbetaya), and TA (Tanganya).

Main Article

TOP