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Volume 12, Number 2—February 2006

Dispatch

Introductions of West Nile Virus Strains to Mexico

Eleanor Deardorff*, José G. Estrada-Franco*, Aaron C. Brault†, Roberto Navarro-Lopez‡, Arturo Campomanes-Cortes‡, Pedro Paz-Ramirez‡, Mario Solis-Hernandez‡, Wanichaya N. Ramey†, C. Todd Davis*, David W.C. Beasley*, Robert B. Tesh*, Alan D.T. Barrett*, and Scott C. Weaver*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA; †University of California, Davis, California, USA; ‡Comisión México-Estados Unidos para la Prevención de la Fiebre Aftosa y Otras Enfermedades Exóticas de los Animales, Mexico City, Mexico

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Figure 2

Phylogenetic tree generated from the complete open reading frame of West Nile virus sequences using a Bayesian analysis. Virus strains are labeled by GenBank accession number followed by the state and/or country, year, and host of isolation. Numbers indicate Bayesian probability values followed by neighbor-joining bootstrap values for groups to the right. The tree was rooted by using an outgroup comprised of Old World strains of West Nile virus, including a lineage 2 strain (Table).

Figure 2. Phylogenetic tree generated from the complete open reading frame of West Nile virus sequences using a Bayesian analysis. Virus strains are labeled by GenBank accession number followed by the state and/or country, year, and host of isolation. Numbers indicate Bayesian probability values followed by neighbor-joining bootstrap values for groups to the right. The tree was rooted by using an outgroup comprised of Old World strains of West Nile virus, including a lineage 2 strain (Table).

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