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Volume 12, Number 4—April 2006

Synopsis

Domestic Ducks and H5N1 Influenza Epidemic, Thailand

Thaweesak Songserm*, Rungroj Jam-on*, Numdee Sae-Heng*, Noppadol Meemak†, Diane J. Hulse-Post‡, Katharine M. Sturm-Ramirez‡, and Robert G. Webster‡Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Kasetsart University, Nakornpathom, Thailand; †Western Veterinary Research and Development Center, Rachaburi, Thailand; ‡St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA

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Figure 2

Example of grazing-duck movement. A single flock of ducks was moved 3 times by truck in 1 season in 2004. The size of the flock is 3,000–10,000. The time spent at each site depends on the availability of rice fields at the site: an acre of rice could support 3,000 ducks for 1 to 2 days. The duck owners have agreements with the landowners regarding the time of harvest and the acreage available. One flock could spend as long as 1 month at a single site before being moved to the next.

Figure 2. Example of grazing-duck movement. A single flock of ducks was moved 3 times by truck in 1 season in 2004. The size of the flock is 3,000–10,000. The time spent at each site depends on the availability of rice fields at the site: an acre of rice could support 3,000 ducks for 1 to 2 days. The duck owners have agreements with the landowners regarding the time of harvest and the acreage available. One flock could spend as long as 1 month at a single site before being moved to the next.

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