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Volume 12, Number 5—May 2006

Dispatch

Enterobacter cloacae Outbreak and Emergence of Quinolone Resistance Gene in Dutch Hospital

Armand Paauw*Comments to Author , Ad C. Fluit*, Jan Verhoef*, and Maurine A. Leverstein-van Hall*
Author affiliations: *University Medical Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands

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Figure 2

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, susceptibility patterns, and key resistance genes for recipient and transconjugants in in vitro conjugation experiments. Boxes denote the area of variability in the PFGE patterns between isolates with and without pQC. CIP, ciprofloxacin; TOB, tobramycin; CRO, ceftriaxone; TET, tetracycline. *Escherichia coli transformant served as donor for Enterobacter cloacae 02-0702.

Figure 2. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, susceptibility patterns, and key resistance genes for recipient and transconjugants in in vitro conjugation experiments. Boxes denote the area of variability in the PFGE patterns between isolates with and without pQC. CIP, ciprofloxacin; TOB, tobramycin; CRO, ceftriaxone; TET, tetracycline. *Escherichia coli transformant served as donor for Enterobacter cloacae 02-0702.

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