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Volume 12, Number 5—May 2006

Research

Novel Swine Influenza Virus Subtype H3N1, United States

Porntippa Lekcharoensuk*1, Kelly M. Lager*, Ramesh Vemulapalli†, Mary Woodruff†, Amy L. Vincent*, and Jürgen A. Richt*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *US Department of Agriculture, Ames, Iowa, USA; †Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

Main Article

Figure 2

Alignment of deduced amino acid sequences within the hemagglutinin (HA) 1 region of HA genes of H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs), H3N2 turkey isolates, and H3N1 SIVs. The amino acid sequence represents the consensus sequence, and the amino acid at position 1 is the first amino acid following the signal peptide (37). Dots represent amino acids similar to the consensus. Note that according to H3 structure (37), the residues representing the antigenic sites are underlined and the receptor bindin

Figure 2. Alignment of deduced amino acid sequences within the hemagglutinin (HA) 1 region of HA genes of H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs), H3N2 turkey isolates, and H3N1 SIVs. The amino acid sequence represents the consensus sequence, and the amino acid at position 1 is the first amino acid following the signal peptide (37). Dots represent amino acids similar to the consensus. Note that according to H3 structure (37), the residues representing the antigenic sites are underlined and the receptor binding sites are in boldface. The alignment shows that PU243 and PU542 may have emerged from the H3N2 turkey isolates. The residues within the receptor-binding site are relatively conserved.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand

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