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Volume 12, Number 6—June 2006

Research

Coccidioidomycosis as a Common Cause of Community-acquired Pneumonia

Lisa Valdivia*†, David Nix*‡, Mark Wright*, Elizabeth Lindberg*, Timothy Fagan§, Donald Lieberman§, T'Prien Stoffer*, Neil M. Ampel*†, and John N. Galgiani*†Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona, USA; †Southern Arizona Veterans Administration Health Care System, Tucson, Arizona, USA; ‡University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Tucson, Arizona, USA; §Arizona Community Physicians, Tucson, Arizona, USA

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Table 1

Demographic characteristics of the study sample*

Characteristic Total (N = 55) Persons with valley fever (n = 16) Others (n = 39)
Male sex, no. (%) 30 (55) 8 (50) 22 (56)
Median age, y (IQR) 48 (33–63) 47 (30–57) 48 (33–63)
Race, no. (%)
Non-Hispanic white 48 (87) 13 (81) 35 (90)
Hispanic 4 (3.6) 2 (13) 2 (5.1)
Asian 3 (5.5) 1 (6.3) 2 (5.1)
Median body mass index (IQR) 26 (22–31) 25 (22–30) 26 (23–31)
Median length of exposure in disease-endemic area, y (IQR)† 9 (5–24) 6.5 (3.5–10) 10 (6–26)
Coexisting condition
COPD 2 0 2
Asthma 9 1 8
Lung disease 9 2 7
History of pneumonia 4 1 3
Renal disease 2 1 1
Liver disease 1 0 1
Immunocompromised 0 0 0
Rheumatologic 1 0 1

*IQR, interquartile range; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
†p = 0.043.

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