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Volume 12, Number 6—June 2006

Research

Temple Monkeys and Health Implications of Commensalism, Kathmandu, Nepal

Lisa Jones-Engel*Comments to Author , Gregory A. Engel*†, John Heidrich‡, Mukesh Chalise§¶, Narayan Poudel#, Raphael Viscidi**, Peter A. Barry††, Jonathan S. Allan‡‡, Richard Grant*, and Randy Kyes*
Author affiliations: *University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; †Swedish Providence Family Medicine Residency, Seattle, Washington, USA; ‡University of New Mexico Medical School, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA; §Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal; ¶Nepal Biodiversity Research Society, Kathmandu, Nepal; #Department of National Park and Wildlife Conservation, Kathmandu, Nepal; **Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; ††University of California, Davis, California, USA; ‡‡Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, Texas, USA

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Figure 3

Natural forage is extremely limited at Swoyambhu. Rhesus macaques routinely raid garbage bins and people's homes in search of food. (Photo by R. Kyes.)

Figure 3. Natural forage is extremely limited at Swoyambhu. Rhesus macaques routinely raid garbage bins and people's homes in search of food. (Photo by R. Kyes.)

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