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Volume 12, Number 7—July 2006

Dispatch

Smallpox during Pregnancy and Maternal Outcomes

Hiroshi Nishiura*†Comments to Author 
Author affiliation: *University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; †Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan

Main Article

Table A1

Case fatality among pregnant women with smallpox by clinical types of variola major, according to data from 19th- and early 20th-century outbreaks*

Reference Hemorrhagic
Confluent
Discrete
VSE
D/C CF (95% CI) D/C CF (95% CI) D/C CF (95% CI) D/C CF (95% CI)
Meyer (1), 1868–1872 13/13 100.0 (NC) 9/26 34.6 (16.3–52.9) 0/37 0.0 (NC)
Sangregorio (2), 1887 3/3 100.0 (NC) 20/22 90.9 (78.9–100.0) 3/40 7.5 (0.0–15.7) 0/7 0.0 (NC)
van der Willigen (3), 1893–1894 6/6 100.0 (NC) 4/4 100.0 (NC) 2/10 20.0 (0.0–44.8) 0/60 0.0 (NC)
Charpentier (4), 1898 13/13 100.0 (NC) 17/34 50.0 (33.2–66.80 4/45 8.9 (0.6–17.2)
Queirel (5), 1906 8/8 100.0 (NC) 2/3 66.7 (13.3–100.0) 0/8 0.0 (NC)
Rao (6), 1959–1962 14/14 100.0 (NC) 12/32 37.5 (20.7–54.3) 0/48 0.0 (NC)

*Hemorrhagic, widespread hemorrhages in the skin and mucous membranes; confluent, confluent rash on the face and arms; discrete, areas of normal skin visible between pustules, even on the face; VSE, variola sine eruptione, fever without rash caused by variola virus, also known as varioloid (8,9); D/C, Smallpox deaths/cases; CF, case fatality; CI, confidence interval; NC, not calculable.

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