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Volume 12, Number 8—August 2006

Research

Bat-transmitted Human Rabies Outbreaks, Brazilian Amazon

Elizabeth S.T. da Rosa*, Ivanete Kotait†, Taciana F.S. Barbosa*, Maria L. Carrieri†, Paulo E. Brandão†, Amiraldo S. Pinheiro‡, Alberto L. Begot‡, Marcelo Y. Wada§, Rosely C. de Oliveira§, Edmundo C. Grisard¶, Márcia Ferreira§, Reynaldo J. da Silva Lima‡, Lúcia Montebello§, Daniele B.A. Medeiros*, Rita C.M. Sousa#, Gilberta Bensabath*, Eduardo H. Carmo¶, and Pedro F.C. Vasconcelos*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Instituto Evandro Chagas, Belém, Brazil; †Instituto Pasteur, São Paulo, Brazil; ‡Secretaria de Saúde do Estado do Pará, Belém, Brazil; §Ministério da Saúde, Brasília, Brazil; ¶Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil; #Universidade Federal do Pará, Belém, Brazil

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Figure 2

Figure 2. Neighbor-joining tree with K2P model based on partial nucleoprotein gene sequences of rabies virus from Desmodus rotundus AgV3, raccoons, fixed strains, and dog AgV2. Each taxon is represented by its respective GenBank accession number (human strains from the present study are in bold and underlined). Numbers at each node are 1,000 bootstrap replicate values; the bar indicates genetic distance.

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