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Volume 13, Number 12—December 2007

Perspective

Need for Improved Methods to Collect and Present Spatial Epidemiologic Data for Vectorborne Diseases

Lars Eisen*Comments to Author  and Rebecca J. Eisen†
Author affiliations: *Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; †Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Areas predicted by a model based on peridomestically acquired plague cases from 1957 through 2004 to pose high risk to humans in the Four Corners Region (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah) are depicted in light gray. Those high-risk areas on privately or tribally owned land are shown in dark gray. Black circles represent locations of peridomestically acquired human plague cases. States comprising the Four Corners Region are shown within the United States in the inset. Reprinted with permission of the Journal of Medical Entomology from Eisen et al. (9).

Figure 1. Areas predicted by a model based on peridomestically acquired plague cases from 1957 through 2004 to pose high risk to humans in the Four Corners Region (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah) are depicted in light gray. Those high-risk areas on privately or tribally owned land are shown in dark gray. Black circles represent locations of peridomestically acquired human plague cases. States comprising the Four Corners Region are shown within the United States in the inset. Reprinted with permission of the Journal of Medical Entomology from Eisen et al. (9).

Main Article

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