Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 13, Number 12—December 2007

Dispatch

Crow Deaths Caused by West Nile Virus during Winter

Jennifer R. Dawson*Comments to Author , Ward B. Stone†, Gregory D. Ebel‡1, David S. Young‡, David S. Galinski†, Jason P. Pensabene†, Mary A. Franke‡, Millicent Eidson*§, and Laura D. Kramer‡§
Author affiliations: *New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA; †New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Delmar, New York, USA; ‡New York State Department of Health, Slingerlands, New York, USA; §State University of New York, Albany, New York, USA;

Main Article

Figure

Crow deaths associated with West Nile virus (WNV) infection and maximum and mean temperatures for Poughkeepsie, New York, USA (December 1, 2004–March 31, 2005). Roost area was checked for crow carcasses at least every 48 hours after February 10, 2005. Temperature data were obtained from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA. All 98 crow carcasses were tested for WNV by reverse transcription–PCR (RT-PCR) (2), VecTest, and Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform (3,4). Twelve were positive by all 3 tests; 1 crow collected on March 7, 2005, was positive by RT-PCR only.

Figure. Crow deaths associated with West Nile virus (WNV) infection and maximum and mean temperatures for Poughkeepsie, New York, USA (December 1, 2004–March 31, 2005). Roost area was checked for crow carcasses at least every 48 hours after February 10, 2005. Temperature data were obtained from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA. All 98 crow carcasses were tested for WNV by reverse transcription–PCR (RT-PCR) (2), VecTest, and Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform (3,4). Twelve were positive by all 3 tests; 1 crow collected on March 7, 2005, was positive by RT-PCR only.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

TOP