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Volume 13, Number 12—December 2007

Research

Hospitalizations and Deaths Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, United States, 1999–2005

Eili Klein*, David L. Smith†, and Ramanan Laxminarayan*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Resources for the Future, Washington DC, USA; †National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA;

Main Article

Figure 2

Primary diagnoses of Staphylococcus aureus–related hospitalizations. The most frequent primary diagnosis associated with other S. aureus–related infections was other cellulitis and abscess (International Classification of Diseases [ICD]-9 682), followed by postoperative infection (ICD-9 998.59), infections from an implanted device or graft (ICD-9 996), osteomyelitis (ICD-9 730), and diabetes mellitus (ICD-9 250). Cellulitis and abscess infections increased at a rate >25% per year from 1999 through 2005. No other primary diagnosis infection showed a major increase over this period.

Figure 2. Primary diagnoses of Staphylococcus aureus–related hospitalizations. The most frequent primary diagnosis associated with other S. aureus–related infections was other cellulitis and abscess (International Classification of Diseases [ICD]-9 682), followed by postoperative infection (ICD-9 998.59), infections from an implanted device or graft (ICD-9 996), osteomyelitis (ICD-9 730), and diabetes mellitus (ICD-9 250). Cellulitis and abscess infections increased at a rate >25% per year from 1999 through 2005. No other primary diagnosis infection showed a major increase over this period.

Main Article

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