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Volume 13, Number 3—March 2007

Dispatch

Detection of G12 Human Rotaviruses in Nepal

Sher Bahadur Pun*, Toyoko Nakagomi*†Comments to Author , Jeevan Bahadur Sherchand‡§, Basu Dev Pandey¶, Luis E. Cuevas#, Nigel A. Cunliffe†, C.A. Hart†, and Osamu Nakagomi*†Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan; †University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; ‡Tribhuvan University Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu, Nepal; §Infectious and Tropical Diseases Research Centre, Kathmandu, Nepal; ¶Sukra Raj Tropical and Infectious Disease Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal; #Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom;

Main Article

Figure 1

Detection after electrophoresis on a 2% agarose gel of the PCR amplification product with a primer pair G12F and G12R. The prototype rotavirus strain for each G serotype was as follows; G1, Wa; G2, KUN; G3, MO; G4, ST3; G5 OSU; G6, NCDV; G7, PO-13; G8, MW33; G9, 95H115; G10, B223; G11, YM; G12, L26; G13, L338; and G14, FI23. The first and last lanes show molecular mass markers in basepairs.

Figure 1. Detection after electrophoresis on a 2% agarose gel of the PCR amplification product with a primer pair G12F and G12R. The prototype rotavirus strain for each G serotype was as follows; G1, Wa; G2, KUN; G3, MO; G4, ST3; G5 OSU; G6, NCDV; G7, PO-13; G8, MW33; G9, 95H115; G10, B223; G11, YM; G12, L26; G13, L338; and G14, FI23. The first and last lanes show molecular mass markers in basepairs.

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