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Volume 13, Number 5—May 2007

Dispatch

Environmental Source of Candida dubliniensis

Miles A. Nunn*Comments to Author , Stefanie M. Schäfer*, Michael A. Petrou†, and Jillian R.M. Brown*
Author affiliations: *National Environment Research Council Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Oxford, England, United Kingdom; †Hammersmith Hospital National Health Service Trust, London, England, United Kingdom;

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Figure 1

Phenotypic characteristics of environmental Candida dubliniensis isolates and reference strain of C. albicans. A) Morphology of pseudohyphal terminal chlamydospores of C. albicans (ATCC90028) and C. dubliniensis SL370 grown at 37°C on Corn Meal Tween 80 agar. Magnification × 50. B) Growth of representative Great Saltee (SL) isolates on Sabouraud agar after 48 h of incubation at 37°C and 43°C. The growth of the following isolates is shown: C. albicans (ATCC90028), C. dubliniensis (NCPF3949), and C. dubliniensis SL370, SL397, SL407, and SL410 (clockwise from the top in each panel).

Figure 1. Phenotypic characteristics of environmental Candida dubliniensis isolates and reference strain of C. albicans. A) Morphology of pseudohyphal terminal chlamydospores of C. albicans (ATCC90028) and C. dubliniensis SL370 grown at 37°C on Corn Meal Tween 80 agar. Magnification × 50. B) Growth of representative Great Saltee (SL) isolates on Sabouraud agar after 48 h of incubation at 37°C and 43°C. The growth of the following isolates is shown: C. albicans (ATCC90028), C. dubliniensis (NCPF3949), and C. dubliniensis SL370, SL397, SL407, and SL410 (clockwise from the top in each panel).

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