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Volume 13, Number 6—June 2007

Research

West Nile Virus Viremia in Eastern Chipmunks (Tamias striatus) Sufficient for Infecting Different Mosquitoes

Kenneth B. Platt*Comments to Author , Bradley J. Tucker*, Patrick G. Halbur*, Sonthaya Tiawsirisup†, Bradley J. Blitvich*, Flor G. Fabiosa*, Lyric C. Bartholomay*, and Wayne A. Rowley*
Author affiliations: *Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA; †Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand;

Main Article

Figure 1

West Nile virus (WNV) viremia profile in 8 eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) that were inoculated intramuscularly with virus. One chipmunk received 105.7 PFU of WNV and was sampled only on day 2 postinoculation (p.i.). Three chipmunks received 103.5 PFU of WNV, 1 received 102.6 PFU, and 3 received 101.5 PFU. The number of chipmunks that received 103.5 PFU of WNV decreased to 2 on day 3 p.i. and to 1 on day 4 p.i. The number of chipmunks that received 101.5 PFU of WNV was 2 on days 2 and 3 p.i.

Figure 1. West Nile virus (WNV) viremia profile in 8 eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) that were inoculated intramuscularly with virus. One chipmunk received 105.7 PFU of WNV and was sampled only on day 2 postinoculation (p.i.). Three chipmunks received 103.5 PFU of WNV, 1 received 102.6 PFU, and 3 received 101.5 PFU. The number of chipmunks that received 103.5 PFU of WNV decreased to 2 on day 3 p.i. and to 1 on day 4 p.i. The number of chipmunks that received 101.5 PFU of WNV was 2 on days 2 and 3 p.i.

Main Article

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